If Your Hardware and OS are Older than Your Interns, Fix It

Yesterday, I wrote my monthly column for Redmond Magazine about dealing with situations where your management doesn’t want to invest in the resources to provide reliability for your hardware and software environment. Whether its redundant hardware and even offsite backups, many IT organizations fail at these basic tasks, because the business side of the organization fails to see the benefit, or more likely doesn’t perceive the total risk of having a major outage.

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Is this your hardware?

As I was writing the column and as mentioned in the column, AMC theaters had a system meltdown the other day, during the early sale of tickets for the premier of the new Avengers movie. The next day, Arizona Iced Tea (whom I didn’t realize was still in business) got ransomwared.

 

While I agree with Andy about testing your restores, I wanted to address a couple of other things. If you are running an old OS like Windows 2003, your business is at risk. If for some reason you absolutely have to run a 16 year old operating system in your environment, you should ensure that it is isolated enough on your network that it’s exposure is limited.

Additionally, as an IT organization it’s your job to be yelling up and down at your software vendors who won’t support modern versions of infrastructure components like operating and database systems. And yes, while I’m a consultant now, I’ve had many real jobs, and I understand the business chooses the software packages they want to run. I also understand, that when the org gets ransomwared because “SomeShittyApp” needed to run on an unpatched XP box with an SMB-1 share open to the internet, IT are going to be the folks whose jobs are on the line.

One of the other things I brought up in my column is how to handle the PR aspects of a system outage. Let’s face it, if your site and services are down, you need to be able to explain to your customers why and what your timeline for repair is. When you are investing in your systems and doing all of the right things, it is very easy to be transparent and explain “we had redundancy in place, but the failure happened in such a way that we incurred an outage”, sounds a lot better than “yeah, we had to run an OS that’s older than our interns because we didn’t have the budget for an upgrade.”

Finally, if you are on really old hardware (hint: if your servers were originally beige and are now a much yellower shade of beige, you’re on really old hardware), it’s probably cheaper and more efficient to do a cloud migration. You can move to Azure IaaS (or AWS) or if you’re a VMWare shop their cloud option on AWS offers a very simple migration path, especially if your cloud experience is limited. Just get off that really old hardware and software and onto something that gets patched regularly.

About jdanton1
A DBA, cyclist, cook (who likes to play chef occasionally)

One Response to If Your Hardware and OS are Older than Your Interns, Fix It

  1. Awesome

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