PASS Summit Speaker Selection Changes—My Take

Monday PASS announced its changes to the speaker selection process, you can read the details here. This is a big change—there will be preselected speakers from a pool have folks who have a long track record of successfully speaking at PASS Summit. Is this a good thing or bad thing? I think it is a good thing, so long as it is implemented carefully. I don’t want to see new speakers get locked out of the speaking at Summit, but I also want to see good sessions from good speakers.
This change will allow PASS to better structure the conference. A good example of this is Nic Cain’s (b|t) idea for curated tracks. In order to have a “new DBA” or “new BI analyst” track, you need to have speakers collaborating with each other in order to build the complimentary track.

Another consideration is NDA content—a good example of this was last year. I would have loved to have done a talk about SQL Server on Linux, which I knew was going to be un-NDAed by Summit, however since submission is public, I couldn’t submit an abstract on it.

My advice for new speakers who want to speak at Summit? It’s the same as it’s always been—blog (note—the blogging part of this is important!) and speak about whatever interests you. Of course, you need to be strategic about submitting to a large conference like Summit, but to a local SQL Saturday, or a user group? Those organizers are begging for speakers. Additionally, consider speaking at PASS Virtual Chapters—they are many, and they meet every month, and there is no cost (other than your time) involved with speaking there.

As you develop as a speaker and writer, you’ll get better known, and develop your own niche. You will also get rejected. Getting rejected sucks—trust me, I submitted to three Summits before I was chosen (I was also nominated for MVP like 10x before getting it, but I digress). When you get rejected look at your abstracts and try to understand how you can make them better. Have a friend or colleague review them. This is an ongoing process.

I don’t think most speakers will notice a big difference with this new process. The speakers who are preselected, were likely going to get selected anyway. The big difference is they will have chosen their topic versus being subject to the whim of the program committee. If you’re a new speaker–speak as much as you can. VCs are free, and your local user group needs speakers. If you live in the middle of nowhere, a lot of user groups will welcome remote presentations. Hone your skills. Write some blog posts (you may have noticed this is my third blogging mention, fire up your keyboard). There’s a new version of SQL Server this year. Get inspired!

Azure Resource Locks are Your Friend in Development

One of the great advantages of the cloud computing is the ability to power off resources that are not in use to save some money. Sure, your production database servers should be running 24×7, but that VM, or SQL Data Warehouse you are developing against during the week? You can shut it down at 7 PM (1900 for the Europeans reading this) and not start it up. Azure even recently introduced an auto-shutdown feature for VMs.

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Unfortunately, there is no auto-startup feature, but that is easy enough to code using an Azure automation job.

This sounds great, can it walk my dog, too?

Unfortunately, there’s one problem with our awesome budget saving proposal. Sometimes developers have jobs that run beyond the time they leave the office. For example, last night at one of my clients a developer had an SSIS package running after he left, and it got killed when the SSIS machine auto-shutdown at 7. That isn’t good.

The solution for this is Azure resource locks—you can put a lock on any resource in Azure. A lock can do one of the two things—first there are delete locks which simply keep a resource from being deleted. It is not a bad idea to put a delete lock on all of your production resources to prevent any accidental deletion from happening. The second type of lock is a read-only lock, and these are a little more aggressive. You can’t do anything to a resource with a read-only lock—you can’t add a drive to a VM, you can’t resize, and most importantly, you can’t shutdown the resource.

You can use the portal, PowerShell, or CLI to create a lock. It’s a fairly simple construct that can be extremely beneficial. You can get current details for lock creation from the Azure Documentation.

My developers have access to the portal (thanks to role based access control and resource groups), so I’ve instructed them on how to place locks on resources, and how to remove them. As an administrator, you probably want to monitor for locks, to ensure that they aren’t left in place after they are needed.

You’re Speaking…and You Don’t Have Slides

I had this dream that other week. I was in the big room at PASS Summit, sitting in the audience. I was relaxed, as I thought I was presenting later in the day, when I quickly realized, due to the lack of speaker on the stage, that I was the next speaker, and the room was full. And I was playing with my laptop and I didn’t have a slide deck. In my dream, this talk was a 300 level session on troubleshooting SQL Server, something I feel like I could do pretty easily, you know with slides. Or a whiteboard.

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http://tse3.mm.bing.net/th?id=OIP.mek7WCJGE_T7QapryUckqQEsDh&pid=15.1

I woke up, before I started speaking. So, I’m not sure how I would have handled it—interpretive dance? I’m a pretty bad dancer. One thing, I will mention, and I saw my friend Allan Hirt (b|t) have to do this last month in Boston—really good (and really well rehearsed) speakers, can do a very good talk without their slides. Slides can be a crutch—one of the common refrains in Speaker Idol judging is don’t read your slides. It is bad form—do I sometimes read my slides? Yeah, everyone does occasionally. But when you want to deliver a solid technical message, the best way to do that is telling stories.

I’m doing a talk next month in Belgium (April 10, in Gent), right before SQL Bits. It’s going to be about what not to do in DR. My slide deck is mostly going to be pictures, and I’m going to tell stories—stories from throughout my career, and some stores from friends. It’s going to be fun, names will be changed to protect the guilty.

So my question and guidance for you dear readers, is to think about what you would do if the projector failed and you did not have a whiteboard. I can think of a number of talks I can do without a whiteboard–in India last year, another instructor and I demonstrated Azure networking by using our bodies as props. What would you do in this situation?

Monitoring Availability Groups—New Tools from Solarwinds

As I mentioned in my post a couple of weeks ago, monitoring the plan cache on a readable secondary replica can be a challenge. My customer was seeing dramatically different performance, depending on whether a node was primary or secondary. As amazing as the Query Store in SQL Server 2016 is, it does not allow you to view statistics from the readable secondary. So that leaves you writing xQuery to mine the plan cache DMVs for the query information you are trying to identify.

My friends at Solarwinds (Lawyers: see disclaimer at bottom of post) introduced version 11.0 of Database Performance Analyzer (DPA, a product you may remember as Ignite) which has full support for Availability Group monitoring. As you can see in the screenshot below, DPA gives a nice overview of the status of your AG, and also lets you dig into the performance on each node.

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There are a host of other features in their new releases, which you can check out some of their new hybrid features in their flagship product Orion. Amongst these features, a couple jumped out at me—there is now support for Amazon RDS and Azure SQL Database in DPA, and there is some really cool correlation data that will let your compare performance across your infrastructure. So, when you the DBA is arguing with the SAN, network, and VM teams about where the root cause of the performance problem, this tool can quickly isolate the root cause of the issue. With less fighting. These are great products, give them a look.

Disclaimer: I was not paid for this post, but I do paid work for SolarWinds on a regular basis.

SQL Clone—Win Fabulous Prizes!!!

Want a chance to win a really cool prize (5 Amazon Dots, and a copy of SQL Clone), while learning about a cool product from Redgate? My friends at Redgate are in the process of releasing a really awesome tool call SQL Clone. So what is SQL Clone?

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One of the challenges I’ve faced through my career as a DBA is the ability to have a reliable copy of a production database to test against. Sure, when I worked at Comcast we had dev, qa, test, and prod environments, but many of the smaller organizations I worked for and consult with, don’t have that luxury. Even when I was at Comcast, the overwhelming cost of storage really limited our ability to maintain consistent development platforms.

So what is the solution? SQL Clone offers a virtual copies of your  database, in seconds, whilst only taking up 40 MB of disk space. How does it do it? Redgate stores pointers to your database in the copy. This means you can have one copy of your database and multiple clones, so that different parts of your dev team can work together in harmony. This data will grow a bit as each developer queries the data, but if you dealing with very large (> 5TB) or even just pretty big databases, this can greatly reduce your storage cost and increate developer productivity.

To learn more about Red Gate SQL Clone, check out this video:
  
 https://youtu.be/1zI2Oj9EZM8

You can see Grant Fritchey yell at an Amazon Alexa to create a clone of a database. It’s that easy.

So for the contest:

I’d like you to comment on what skill you would build using the echo dot. This can be anything, but database related ideas are likely better, as Redgate will be the judge. Here are some of my ideas:

  • Build a database using SQL Clone Smile
  • Rebuild the statistics on the data warehouse
  • Yell at Joey to go ride his bike
  •  

    For legal purposes you can read the terms and conditions here.

http://www.red-gate.com/products/dba/sql-clone/entrypage/competition-terms-and-conditions

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