How to Transfer an IT Project Effectively

A couple of weeks ago I got some really good news—I was transferring into a new role at my current company. Since this is an internal transfer, the standard two-week notice stretched to four and I had time to properly transfer my existing projects.

It is important to be as effective as possible in doing this, so you aren’t dealing with your existing projects in your new role.

The first thing I recommend doing is introducing the project contact person (In this case a business user) to the DBA you are handing off to. Ideally, you can do this in person, but since we are at multiple sites, I had to do it over email. Make it clear you will be transitioning all responsibilities over to the other DBA, and are trying to be successful in a new role, so can no longer support this project (be really nice about it—kill ‘em with kindness).

Secondly, if you have an email folder for the project, share it with the rest of your DBA team. If you don’t have one—create one and copy as much mail as you can into it. The search function in Outlook 2010 works really well, and sharing the mail may save you a phone call or two down the road.

Finally, and most importantly, you need to build out a project document. Put as much detail in as possible. I used the below sections for mine:

• Project Contacts—Who you work with, and what is their business function • Vendor Contact Info—Who you work with directly (If a small vendor) or contact/support info for a larger vendor

• Business Purpose—What does this application do, and what does it support? What are the uptime requirements?

• Authentication—How is authentication handled? Are there SQL logins to worry about? • Security Groups—This ties back to authentication, but are there domain groups controlling access to the application? Which groups control which rights?

• SQL Jobs—If the application has agent jobs—what are they? What do they do? How do you handle job failure? Who is the point of contact on the jobs?

• General Narrative—Describe anything else about the application. In our case there are some subprocesses that were failing, so I included that information. I also discussed the application patching process, along with some persistent issues we were trying to resolve with the vendor

. • HA/DR—This was touched on earlier, but how is specifically implemented? Where is the database mirrored/replicated to?

• Architecture—A very detailed Visio showing the whole landscape for the application—client connections, database connections, application servers, any external connections.

This list is in no way complete—feel free to add anything in the comments, I’d love to improve my process.

This is important stuff—in order to be as successful as you can  in a new role, you need to be able to transition projects effectively, but this same process can be used to transfer support of an application to an operations team, or outsourcing overnight support.

SQL Rally — Vote for Me!!

For those of you who don’t know, PASS has a new event this year, in addition to the annual PASS Summit in Seattle. SQL Rally will be May 11-13 in Orlando, Florida, and will be a lower cost, slightly more community focussed event.  In addition to the lower cost, sessions will be voted on by the PASS community. You can register to vote here.

I’ve been presenting on SQL Server for a couple of years now, and am heavily involved with the Philadelphia SQL Server Users Group, as well as our SQL Saturday coming on March 5.

So, that brings me here–to shill for your vote. The session I’m presenting is entitled Deploying Data Tier Applications to the Cloud. This will be similar to sessions I presented at Philly .net Code Camp, and the SQL Saturdays in New York and Washington, but with a twist. This will be a start to finish demo of building a database application, using Data Tier Applications, and deploying it to SQL Azure.

My session is in the Azure track of the Database and Application Development track at SQL Rally.

Mark Kromer of Microsoft and I have submitted a similar presentation to TechEd, but this one is unique to SQL Rally. I’d love your vote so I can share it with the community.

Adding a new disk to a SQL Server Cluster Instance

In order to do anything involving a SQL Server clustered instance (restore, backup, store/read data) storage must be accessible to the clustered instance. Here we will discuss the process of how to add a new LUN to a SQL cluster.

First off, have your storage admin add the disk, and make it accessible to all of the nodes of the cluster. Most SANs are different, so I’m not going to discuss that syntax here.

The next step is a little painful, you need to go to each of your cluster nodes and do a rescan of storage. In order to do this, go to Server Manager and right click on Disk Management > Rescan Disks

Next, go the server where the cluster service you would like to add the disk to is running (you can accomplish this by entering the virtual cluster name into Terminal Services) and online the disk (From Disk Management)

After the disk is brought online, it must be initialized. This is done from the same disk management dialogue. Configure this with either a MBR or GUID partition table (preferable for very large LUNS).

Next create the volume, in order to this, right click in the disk area, and select “New Simple Volume”

To create this drive under an existing drive letter (which I like to do for clustering) select “Mount in the following empty NTFS folder”

Create a new folder under the drive letter associated with your cluster resource group. I typically name the folder $RESOURCE_GROUP_$PURPOSE. Where resource group would RG1_ and purpose would be backup/data/logs.

Lastly, you need to label your volume and format. Once again for clarity, I usually for $RESOURCE_GROUP_Identifier_$PURPOSE_$LUN#.

Next, launch failover cluster manager (this can run either on your server or desktop). Select manage a cluster, and the enter the name of the cluster you are managing (if it doesn’t auto-populate)

Right click on the Storage folder on the right and select add a disk. If the disk is presented and configured properly, the cluster should see it, and add it to available disks.

Expand the left hand window and select “Services and Applications”

Right click on the instance you would like to add the storage to, and select “Add Storage”. A dialogue box will pop up with the available disks to add.

This is where you select the appropriate disk and add it into your cluster. You should be able to identify by its disk number and volume information.

Go into SSMS and using the Attach  Database dialogue (or any dialogue that interacts with the files system–backup/restore, etc), and verify that SQL Server can see the disk.

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